Today’s Best Dog Kayak | Finding A Top Rated Kayak For Dogs

kayaking with dogs

The best dog kayak can make your adventures that much better! If you’re a dog owner and a paddler, you already know there’s nothing more incredible than sharing a day on the water with your best friend, your dog. But did you know your dog has special needs — things that make the day as awesome for them as it is for you? Dogs can get cramped, uncomfortable, hot, and tired too. They can also get sunburned, dehydrated, and nervous when a kayak or boat gets too “tippy,” even if they know you’re in control.

Even with all that can be scary for a dog, dogs still love adventure, especially if it involves their owners. They rarely complain, and most importantly, they just want to be by your side. That means more to them than all the sunsets and trails in the world. You’ll both love the adventure more if you take your time to learn how to be the best pet parent you can be. This means that you take the time to teach your dog to swim, float, ride the waves, and behave well aboard your dog-friendly kayak.

While taking your dog kayaking can be the best adventure you and your dog can have, it just makes sense to take their needs into account when selecting a kayak for your dog. Once you have the best kayak for you and your dog, it’s time to start training them to love it as much as you do. Some dogs will take to a boat as though they were born to paddle. Others will need some convincing. Here’s how to train your dog to love paddling so you can enjoy one of the best dog kayaks out there.

Training Your Dog to Love the Water

Not even the best kayak for dogs will work if your dog doesn’t have basic training skills like ”sit,” “stay,” “stop,” “no,” “leave it,” or “come”. Before investing in a dog-friendly kayak, now’s a good time to start working on those skills. Making sure your dog’s basic response to your commands is not so much so you have a well-trained dog, which is pretty cool, but because when you’re out on the water, in the woods, or on the beach, you’ll be confident that your dog isn’t going to go running into traffic. You don’t want your dog bounding over to say “hi” but end up scaring a family or small child located nearby. You also don’t want your dog chasing a skunk, a snake, or even a bear. Also, you don’t want them to run into the woods and get lost either.

Having control of your dog at all times is critical when using a kayak with dog seat. If your dog isn’t trained to basic commands, then always keep them on a 6-foot leash and harness. They should be wearing a doggie life vest as well.

kayakingRelated: Best Kayak Life Vest

A lack of training and response to basic commands creates safety hazards for both you and your dog. Training also includes getting your dog to poop and pee on command. Yes. It’s entirely possible and easy to train your dog to do this. You’ll be glad you did when you hit the shore to let your dog do their thing and you don’t have to wonder if they really “need to go,” or if they just want to explore the old terra firma. It’s worth taking the time to teach your dog this most valuable of commands.

dog kayak

Commands Your Dog Should Know Before Using a Dog-friendly Kayak

Realistically, most owners and dogs will probably hit the water before they’re ready. Hopefully, no one will get injured before you both figure out there’s a reason for training and preparation. As you continue to go out, here are the basic commands your dog should know:

Get in, or Leave

There should be a command for your dog to get into, and another for them to get out of the boat. This can be as simple as “get in the boat,” “leave,” or whatever phrase your dog will understand. You do not want them jumping in the boat or out of the boat when a whim strikes them. Practice these commands on shore first, and then again later, once your boat and the dog are in the water.

Lay Down, Sit, Stay

When dogs get anxious they tend to stand, pace, and jump out of the boat to seek more secure surroundings. This is when the command, “lay down,” “sit,” or “stay” can save you both some stress, especially if you’re trying to navigate rapids or incoming ocean swells or waves. The safest place your dog can be during these times is at the lowest point of gravity, flat on the floor of the boat, out of your way, and not rocking or tipping the boat with their pacing or barking.

Before you even get to the water, you should practice with your kayak on the ground in your yard. Encourage your dog to smell it, explore it, and even sleep in it. Put treats and their favorite toy in the cockpit. Let them find their own way in. It’s okay if they’re a bit hesitant at first. They’ll warm up to it.

They should feel comfortable with the boat on dry land. If they shy away from the boat at first, it might be because it’s a new boat and the chemical smell is offensive to them. If this appears to be part of the problem let the boat off-gas for a few days, then try again. You can also wash the boat with Dawn dishwashing detergent or any pet shampoo or soap your dog is used to.

Never force your dog into the water if they don’t want to go. Never throw your dog into the water, off of a dock, or into a swimming pool hoping to get them to love they water. They’ll lose all trust for you, and probably hate the water more.

Related: Best Kayaks

Your dog should be comfortable around water before you try to take them paddling. Get a small kids’ wading pool and see how they respond. Do they jump in, or steer clear? Take your dog to a pond or small, calm body of water and throw a stick in the water. Do they jump in to chase it, or stay on shore where it’s dry? Sometimes taking a friend and their water-loving dog out for a play date can help convince your dog the water’s fine. Even so, it is important to let them explore at their own pace.

best kayak for dogs

What Size and Breed is Your Dog? Finding the Best Kayak for Your Dog

Dogs come in a range of sizes, usually classified in one of four ways: small, medium, large, and giant. It’s easy to tell the difference between a small breed dog, like a Chihuahua, and a giant breed like the Great Dane, but medium breed dogs aren’t so easy to identify. It makes a difference when you’re selecting a kayak. You want a boat that will carry your combined weight and that will have a compartment or enough deck space where your dog can stretch out comfortably. While all dogs instinctively know how to swim, some are obviously better than others. These breeds are said to be water lovers and natural born swimmers:

  • Australian shepherds
  • Brittany spaniels – all spaniels really
  • Chesapeake Bay retrievers
  • Golden retrievers
  • Portuguese water dogs
  • Labrador retrievers
  • Newfoundlands
  • Poodles
  • Rottweilers

Big Dogs

The large breed category includes dog breeds that weigh more than 50 to 60 pounds but less than 90 pounds at full size. Dogs weighing more than 90 pounds are considered giant breed dogs.

Examples of Large Breed Dogs

  • Akita
  • Alaskan malamute
  • Bernese mountain dog
  • Bloodhound
  • Doberman pinscher
  • German shepherd
  • English setter
  • Old English sheepdog
  • Golden retriever
  • Labrador retriever
  • Greyhound
  • Rottweiler
  • Weimaraner

Medium Sized Dogs

Medium sized dogs are at the midway point between tiny and massive canines, and both height and weight factor into the classification. They generally weigh in the ballpark of 35 to 65 pounds. In terms of height, medium sized dogs are usually from 1 to 2 feet tall, measured from the ground to the withers or shoulder.

Examples of Medium Sized Dogs

  • Cocker spaniels
  • Airedale terriers
  • Whippets
  • Pulis
  • Samoyeds
  • Chinese shar-peis
  • French bulldogs
  • Kerry blue terriers
  • Border collies
  • Portuguese water dogs
  • Australian shepherds
  • Beagles
  • Basenjis
  • Norwegian elkhounds
  • English springer spaniels
  • American pit bull terriers
  • Basset hounds
  • Golden retrievers
  • Siberian huskies
  • Welsh springer spaniels
  • Dalmatian
  • Soft-coated wheaten terriers.

Small Dogs

Small dogs, as any small dog owner knows, like to think they’re big dogs. They have more attitude, courage, and daring than most big dogs. They also have a lot more energy and are less likely to sit still on long paddle trips. However, it all depends on the dog and the owner. If you’re paddling with a small dog, try to take time to go ashore so your small dog can expend some energy.

top dog kayakWhat to Pack in Your Dog-Friendly Kayak

You’ve got a cooler, sunscreen, jacket, and various snacks for your day on the water. But what should you pack for your dog? They’re going to need more than just a water bowl. If you’re a super good pet parent, you’ll install a WoofShade on your kayak. It’s the only kayaking, canoeing, or SUPing sun shade specifically designed to keep your pet out of the blazing sun so they don’t get heatstroke or sunburned. Most paddlers don’t want anything above their head, impeding their connection with the sun and nature, but your dog with their thick fur coat, will appreciate the shade and lower temps these devices offer. WoofShade does not interfere with you or your line of sight, but it does protect your dog, Think of it as a mini-bimini for your pet, providing shade and protection from the sun and rain. You’re also going to need:

  1. A leash. Even if your dog comes when called, never ventures from your side, and is super trained, it’s in your best interest to bring a leash. You may end up going ashore or on a trail where leashes are required. And, because going to new places can be exciting, as well trained as your dog may be, they may need a leash to keep them from running off and getting lost. If like many owners, your dog is not trained and is essentially an excitable, unpredictable personality on four legs, you’re going to be glad you have a leash to keep them close. Even if you aren’t planning on going ashore to explore, your dog has to potty just like you. So pack it.
  2. A doggie life vest. Dogs, like kids, often think the best thing about kayaking is jumping out of the boat to swim. Or they might be terrified of the water. Either way, dogs that are not used to swimming for long periods of time, or in rough water, or in a river, can drown. They do get tired. Their paws are not made to fend off rocks and boulders. And while they swim for 5-10 minutes, they get tired. Some dogs struggle to swim, but with a good life vest, you don’t have to worry.No matter what size dog you have, large, medium, or small, get a vest with handles on the top of the vest that let you grab the dog and lift. You’ll be grateful for this feature each time you need to lift your dog in or out of the boat the boat in areas (docks, boulders, land, other boats) where they can’t jump.
  3. Doggie sunscreen. You already know from your own experience that kayaks on open water offer no shade or sun protection. Dogs with light-colored fur, light-colored noses, or close-cropped fur need sunscreen. They can and will get sunburned just as easily as you. All dogs, regardless of fur color or coat, should wear dog-friendly sunscreen when the UV index is high. Because dogs will groom themselves and get the sunscreen in their system it’s dangerous for them to use some brands of human sunscreen, however, in a pinch, you can use it if you wash it off immediately after coming off of the water. Ask your veterinarian for a product recommendation, or try one of these:
  • My Dog’s Nose It Sunscreen
  • Beach & Dog Co Canine Sunscreen – Zinc and Titanium Dioxide Free – All Natural and Organic Formula for Dogs
  • Epi-Pet Sun Protector Spray for Pets
  1. Bottled water and a water bowl. If you get thirsty, your dog is going to get thirsty too. Yes, they’re happy to drink from whatever lake, pond, or body of water you’re on, but when you’re in your kayak the last thing you want them to do is lean over the side or jump into the water to get a drink. There are dozens of foldable, portable silicone water bowls to choose from but consider, if your boat has room for it, getting a no-spill water bowl like the Prestige Road Refresher Non-Spill Water Bowl. You can put it on the floor of your boat or fasten it to the deck or cockpit and fill it with water. A special lip keeps the water from splashing out into the boat.
  2. Patience. Forget the Youtube videos and photos showing owners and their dogs joyfully and happily sharing the cramped confines of a kayak or SUP board for hours on a sunny day. That’s fantasy. The reality is, your dog on a boat or board is going to be pretty much the same as your dog anywhere else. If they tend to be restless, bored, and antsy at home, they’re going to be the same on a boat. If they like to lie around, sleep, and are content to lie down at your feet at home, they’re going to be the same on a boat. Don’t expect your dog to settle in for the long haul and go out for a full or half day right away. Start them slowly, with 10-30 minutes, depending on the dog. See if they like the boat. Some will, and some won’t. If your dog already likes the water, chances are they’ll love being on a boat. If you have to urge your dog to get in the water, chances are they won’t like a kayak or SUP at first. Be patient. They’re like children. They need to feel safe, secure, and confident before they can enjoy the boat.
  1. A closed cell foam pad or carpeting pad. Dogs don’t have a lot of ways to grab onto things other than their claws. That’s why it’s up to you to ensure any surface where they’ll be spending their time has some way for them to “dig in.” This can mean adhering closed cell foam to your decks with a waterproof adhesive or velcroing a carpet pad to their space. Remember, most dog kayaks are smooth plastic with no way for your pet to gain their balance once they lose it. Closed cell pads don’t absorb water like carpet, but they also don’t last as long as carpet. Either way, test the pad to make sure your dog’s claws can dig in comfortably and deeply enough for them to feel safe and secure. You wouldn’t want to be sliding around a boat in rocky waters without a grab bar, and neither does your dog.
  1. Dog treats and toys. What dog wouldn’t get hungry after a few hours on the water? Bring dog treats, dog food, and snacks for them as well as yourself. Pack a few tennis balls (if they like them) as well. Dogs love to chase sticks, and there are plenty of those available along the shoreline but give them something they can mouth and chew on in the boat as well. If you bring a toy, make sure it floats or tie it securely to something that does; otherwise it will go overboard in the first 15 minutes and sink to the bottom of the lake. It’s Murphy’s law. What can sink, will sink, and in the deepest part of the lake. It will sink faster if it was expensive or a gift from a family member. Just saying.
  1. First aid kit. Dogs will fall prey to the same thing humans will: cuts on their feet, ticks, scratched eyeballs from running into the brush, and broken limbs. The first aid items your dog will need are the same sorts of things you’d have in your own first aid kit. Always remember that any first aid administered to your pet should be followed by immediate veterinary care. First aid care is not a substitute for veterinary care, but it may save your pet’s life until it receives veterinary treatment. Take time to find out how to treat your dog, and how to do pet CPR. Here are some ideas for your doggie first aid kit:
  • Tick Remover
  • Neosporin
  • Hydrogen peroxide (cleaning out wounds)
  • Muzzle
  • Eyedropper
  • Gauze
  • A roll of crepe bandage (5cm width)
  • Do NOT use human adhesive bandages (like Band-Aids®) on pets
  • Any prescribed pet medications your dog is already taking
  1. An old beach towel. This is for your comfort as well as your dog’s. Your dog will get wet, and when dogs get wet, they shake to dry off. This can help you and your dog stay drier and give them something to lie on when you’re on the boat or on shore.

kayak with dog seat

Kayaks that are Not Good for Dogs

Most dogs can adapt to just about any kind of boat their owner wants to share with them. However, if you love your dog, you won’t put them in these two kinds of kayaks:

Ocean Kayaks

Dogs can tolerate a lot: bad equipment, getting wet, being cramped, etc. but one of the things very few of them enjoy is being in a narrow, ocean-going kayak. Unless you have a very small dog, there aren’t a lot of animals who want to be crammed into the narrow, tight quarters of an ocean kayak.

White Water Kayak

White water kayaks are designed to be “worn.” They’re a snug-to-tight fit for the paddler, so they can be easily tipped, rolled, and maneuvered through rough water. Not only is the constant rocking motion upsetting for your dog, there’s also not a lot of room for them inside the cockpit. Laying down on the floor of the boat while it’s rocking means they’re more likely to feel nauseated and sick, making a pretty miserable day for them. If you have a white water kayak and a small dog, you might be able to make it work on flat water, but pay attention to your dog’s body language to ensure you’re not inadvertently torturing them.

What About Inflatable Kayaks?

Many dog owners need or want an inflatable kayak for a variety of reasons. Perhaps the space to store a full-sized hard shell kayak isn’t available, or they don’t have a vehicle that can carry a full-sized kayak, or they simply like the ease of a smaller, lighter kayak. But at the same time, they still want to take their dog with them.

In this case, their primary concern is whether the dog’s claws will puncture the boat. Ultimately, it depends on the dog and the boat. If your dog’s nails are properly trimmed, they’re not likely to puncture a heavy PVC vinyl, which is what many inflatable kayaks are made of. Inflatable kayaks (not the cheap big box store kind, but true inflatables) are tough, super tough. You can make sure the boat’s inflatable compartments are protected by installing or draping closed cell foam over the entry point for your dog. You can also line the bottom of the boat where your dog will be with a closed cell sleeping mat, available at most sporting goods or camping stores. But if you clip your dog’s nails, you should be fine.

Tips for Making Your Dog Kayak Experience Great

Your dog loves you and wants to please you, so that’s a great thing. Now, add treats, hugs, love and positive reinforcement. Be patient. Your dog is going to be a dog, excited, and energetic, wanting to bark at all the things they’re seeing. Use his excitement to get him interested in going paddling and try to understand this new venture from his point of view. This is where that leash, harness, and treats come in handy.

  • Reward your dog for calm behavior and stay calm yourself. Yelling at your dog won’t calm him down; it will just make him fearful. Let him be excited. Wait. When he calms down, then start getting him used to the water. If he’s feeling energetic, throw a ball, let him swim, and let him tire himself out before you load him into the boat.
  • Don’t get too excited or loud yourself. If you’re yelling, hollering, or excited, your dog might be tempted to stand up, to pace, bark, or look for a way to exit the boat.
    Keep an eye on the weather. Your dog won’t like paddling in rough seas and rain any more than you will, at least at the beginning.
  • Don’t tie your dog to the boat. This could be dangerous if you capsize. Not only will your dog be unable to swim to shore, he could easily drown, especially if the boat is swept downstream gets caught up under it.
  • Don’t get mad at your dog if he jumps out of the boat. It happens. Simply paddle to the nearest shore and collect your dog. Then, reach over and grab the handle on the back of their life vest and pull them back into the boat. You can let them paddle around for a bit to tire them out, so they’ll be happy to climb back in the boat.But make sure they’re wearing a life vest, so they don’t just get tired and sink. Basic training comes in really handy here.
  • Make frequent stops. You’re getting a good workout and some fun time while paddling, but your dog isn’t getting much exercise just lying in the boat. Be sure to give him some onshore time every hour or so, and he’ll learn to love paddling as much as you do.
  • Start with calm, shallow water. No one likes to feel terror the first time on a new venture, your dog is no exception. You want him to feel excited, safe, happy, and engaged. Make this experience even more fun for him than for yourself until he learns to embrace the experience. Once he’s happy in calm, quiet waters, you can move up to shallow waves, rapids, and more challenging waters if you want to.
  • Keep a bowl and fresh water on hand. This is especially important if you’re paddling in salt water or if you have a small dog who can’t reach over the side of your boat for a drink.
  • Keep your boat balanced. Decide where you want your dog to side or sleep, then pack your gear around that area in such a way they’re forced to sit where you want them to.
  • Provide shade. Your dog will always get hotter and be more uncomfortable than you when they’re in the open. Provide some sort of shade for them when they’re in the boat. There are a variety of biminis or shades for kayaks you can buy or make. This shade can also be an umbrella, or a homemade shade, or a commercial dog shade like the

dog kayaks

Where Should My Dog Sit?

Where should my dog sit? Good question. What kind of dog do you have? Are they trained? Are they calm? Or are they most likely to leap off the boat at the first hint of fun in the water, or at seeing a fish jump?

Some kayaks have plenty of room in front of your seat for a small to medium sized dog to sit or lie down. Other dog kayaks have large decks in the front or rear of the boat where your dog would prefer to lie. If you have an easily excitable dog, try to buy a kayak where you can quickly reach the handle on their life vest before they launch themselves over the side. Don’t ever tie your dog to the kayak but consider holding their leash until they learn not to jump out of the boat.

Related: Best Kayak Dolly

One of the best ways to get dogs used to “their seat” is to put down a comfortable bed in the area where you want them to be. Then train them. Yes, it’s work on your part, but it will pay huge dividends when you want to take a longer trip without having to worry about your dog launching off the boat at every distraction.

Depending on their size, a dog is a weighted object that needs to be balanced so your kayak doesn’t tip over as they shift. You may have to experiment with your dog to see where they’re most comfortable, but most owners find their dogs like to ride at the bow (front) of the boat where they can see everything and keep their noses into the breeze. Smaller dogs may prefer to curl up in your lap, or as close to you as they can get. In time your dog will find the “sweet spot” on the boat where they feel safe, secure, and able to enjoy the journey. Be patient with them. They’re learning a new sport too.

When your dog gets hot, they will jump in the water to cool down, just as you would. So make sure they get breaks to cool off, to eat, to run around, and to go potty.

Kayak Accessories for Dogs

Believe it or not, a dog-friendly kayak is just the first of many outdoor accessories you can find to make your pet comfortable in the wilderness with you. There’s more:

  • Sunscreen for dogs
  • Shade tents
  • Hammocks for dogs
  • Hats for dogs
  • Non-spill or splash water bowls
  • Seattle Sports SUP Dog Board pad (closed cell foam you cut and adhere to your boat or SUP board to help give your dog traction, available at Walmart, Amazon, outdoor stores)
  • Life vest for dogs (The Life Savior is fantastic)

Coiled, floatable leash

Best Dog Kayak

Ocean Kayak 12-Feet Malibu Two Tandem Sit-On-Top Recreational Kayakdog friendly kayaks

Weight Capacity: 375-425 pounds

Kayak weight: 57 pounds

Length: 12′. Width-34 inch

Dimensions: 144 x 34 x 20 inches. Bow seat width 18.5-inches, Stern seat width 20.25 inches, Center seat width 16.25 inches. Bow leg length 44-inches, Stern leg length 42-inches.

Seating: Will seat two adults and a dog or a child

This is one of the most popular kayaks for pet owners because of the one, two, or two plus a child or pet seating. The maximum weight capacity is 375-425 lbs. maximum, perfect for a couple with a dog of any size. The three-seating position, bow, stern and middle, are for paddling solo, tandem, or tandem with a child or a dog. Overlapping foot wells allow the center seated paddler to have comfortable foot bracing. This kayak has easy carry handles or can be transported with a kayak dolly as well. The hull and deck design allows for easy stacking of multiple boats for easy on dock storage. It’s comfortable whatever your leg length may be, and it has plenty of room for your dog to stretch out, sit, or stand and move about on the front of the kayak.

The Malibu Two is the Swiss Army Knife of kayaks; it does just about everything. Although it’s not necessarily the best at any of them, that’s not what it was designed to be. The basic design provides a stable platform, a versatile deck, and a hull that tracks true and helps handle the wind.


Intex Explorer K2 Kayak, 2-Person Inflatable Kayak Set with Aluminum Oars and High Output Air Pumpbest dog friendly kayaks

Weight Capacity: 400 pounds

Kayak weight:   31.13 pounds

Length: 10-foot 3-inches long.  36-Inches wide

Dimensions: 10’3″ X 3′ X 1’8″

Seating: Will seat two adults or one adult and a dog or a child

This kayak includes an adjustable, inflatable seat with a backrest and a cockpit designed for comfort and space. The front seat can be left out for more space. There is a removable skeg for directional stability, and the bright yellow color helps your dog kayak remain visible to other boats. This kayak is perfect for smaller bodies of water, including lakes and mild rivers. You and your dog can easily explore the shallowest of water. The comfortable inflatable sides and bottom of this kayak make it a perfect choice for an older dog, or for dogs with hip or joint issues. For them, sitting or lying down on the rigid, but soft floor is like resting on a comfortable pillow.

This kayak is a snap to assemble and allows you to take the fun of kayaking wherever you go. Made with rugged vinyl construction, this sturdy dog kayak has an inflatable I-beam floor for comfort and rigidity. Quick inflating or deflating is a breeze with a Boston valve on each side. A grab line and grab handle at each end is provided for your convenience, as well as a U.S. Coast Guard I.D. and a repair patch kit. The Explorer K2 Kayak provides added accessories including: two 86-inch aluminum oars and an Intex high-output pump for easy inflation and deflation.


Vibe Kayaks Yellowfin 130T 13 -Foot Tandem Sit On Top Kayak 2 3 Person Package – Includes 2 Hero Seats 2 Paddlesbest kayak with dog seat

Weight Capacity:  500 pounds

Kayak weight: 80 pounds

Length:  13-foot long. 35 Inches wide

Dimensions:  156 x 35 x 16 inches

Seating: Will seat three adults, or two adults and a dog or a child

This three-person sit-on-top fishing kayak is perfect for fishing, hunting, or camping for a couple and their dog, or even their dog and a small child. With a mount for accessories, you can bring along up to six fishing rods. There are four mounting points for Scotty, RAM, or Railblaza mount rod holders. If it’s just you and your dog, you’ll enjoy the optional center paddle position for solo paddling. That allows your dog to have the run of the back or front of the boat. The two sealed hatches with bag inserts, a large bungeed rear tank well and bow cargo bungee system means there’s room for your gear and your dog’s food, water, toys, and bedding as well as your hunting, fishing or camping gear. There are also adjustable footrests in this kayak for customized comfort.

If you have a larger dog, you may want to add a dog bed – either a bean bag dog bed or hammock that rests over the cutouts and contours of the floor of this dog kayak. Small to medium sized dogs should have no problem with the design.


Perception Kayak Tribe Roxietop kayak for dogs

Weight Capacity: 300 pounds

Kayak weight:  46 pounds

Length:  9.5-foot long. 31.2  Inches wide

Dimensions: 113 x 31.2 x 16.2 inches

Seating: Will seat one adult and one small-to-medium sized dog

Owners of small to small medium sized dogs are going to love the Perception Kayak Tribe Roxie. At only 9.5 feet long, versatility is the name of the game in this fun, sit-on-top boat. The comfort seating system has thick padding for superior support for you, although you’ll need to add a closed cell foam bed for your dog. There’s an adjustable seatback positioning for a personalized fit, and the multiple footrest options accommodate paddlers of all sizes and leg lengths. A large front and rear open storage mean there’s room for a cooler and other gear – including your dog’s food, treats, and toys. The rear storage area has bungee cord that lashes to secure gear of any shape or size or to hold a dog bed for your pet. A convenient drink holder keeps your favorite beverage from spilling.

The Tribe 9.5 is an affordable, easy-going, great looking, sit-on-top that performs terrifically in surf and rough ocean conditions. It is also speedy and maneuverable on flat water and lazy rivers. With side handles built-in, plus additional bow and stern handles, carrying and car topping is a breeze. Proudly designed, molded, and hand-assembled in the USA, the Tribe is also backed by a 5-year limited manufacturer’s warranty.


Lifetime Tamarack Angler 100 Fishing Kayakbest dog kayak

Weight Capacity:  275 pounds

Kayak weight:  56.5 pounds

Length:  10-foot long. 31 Inches wide

Dimensions: 120 x 31 x 14.1 inches

Seating: Will seat one adult and one large dog, or two small-to-medium sized dogs

Owners with multiple dogs will love this kayak. It’s extremely stable, which means your dog will feel comfortable moving around on top of it, and you won’t worry about tipping over. Constructed of UV-protected, high-density Polyethylene, it has multiple footrest positions for different size riders. The stable flat bottom and front and rear decks are roomy enough to accomodate a small to medium sized dog at each end. An adjustable padded seat back and seat pad mean comfort for the human paddler.

You can tour and fish with the two flush mounted fishing rod holders and still have plenty of room for your dog. There are front and rear shock cord straps for securing gear or a cooler. There are two 6-inch storage compartments in the rear and the center, meaning there is plenty of room for both you and your pet’s gear and food. This kayak has one paddle keeper and comes with one adult black paddle. This human and dog kayak has front and rear t-handles for easy transport. The deep hull tracking channels ensurs stability and straight movement through the water. It also feautres stability chine rails. Durable high-density Polyethylene (HDPE) construction means you and your dog will enjoy this boat for years.

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{"code":"10OFF"
"label":"Nothing"
"label":"Nothing"
"win":false}
"win":false}
{"code":"LOCKDOWN10"
{"code":"LOCKDOWN10"
"label":"Save 10% OFF"
"label":"Save 10% OFF"
"win":true}
"win":true}
{"code":"10OFF"
{"code":"10OFF"
"label":"Sorry!"
"label":"Sorry!"
"win":false}
"win":false}
{"code":"15UNLOCKED"
{"code":"15UNLOCKED"
"label":"Save 15% OFF"
"label":"Save 15% OFF"
"win":true}
"win":true}
{"code":"FREESHIPPING"
{"code":"FREESHIPPING"
"label":"Nope"
"label":"Nope"
"win":false}
"win":false}
{"code":""
{"code":""
"label":"Save 20% OFF"
"label":"Save 20% OFF"
"win":false}
"win":false}
{"code":"25OFF"
{"code":"25OFF"
"label":"Next time"
"label":"Next time"
"win":false}]
"win":false}]