Camping in Oregon

Camping in Oregon | Ultimate Guide To The Best Oregon Campgrounds

Shares

Camping in Oregon is an adventure in itself — towering volcanoes, deep crater lakes, and pristine wilderness areas make for some of the best camping in the northwest. Things you should know about Oregon if you haven’t been there, are that it’s a state that has beaches, mountains and desert. So matter what kind of environment you’re looking for, you’ll find it there.

There are 196 state parks in Oregon, plus a number of private and public campgrounds. Of those state parks more than 50 offer camping. Twenty-eight campgrounds accept reservations year-round. The others are first-come, first-served. While first-come, first-served parks don’t accept reservations for campsites, they do take them for cabins, yurts, teepees and other special facilities.  Check-in time is 4 p.m. each day.

Most of the campgrounds, parks, and day use areas are located in the western part of the state – near the ocean, but there are parks throughout the state. For a complete guide to all the state’s campgrounds, visit the official state site

Campgrounds Across Oregon

There are more than 50 campgrounds in Oregon that offer RV and tent camping, as well as those who rent cabins and yurts. These are campgrounds that not only accept reservations, but that offer unique and exciting surroundings or activities.

Ainsworth State Park 

camping in oregon

Credit to ©Lyn Topinka, 2014

Offers privacy, trees, and a splendid view of St. Peter’s Dome, a majestic basalt monolith rising 2,000 feet above the mighty Columbia River.

  • 40 full-hookup sites canopied in a laid-back, tree-filled setting
  • Six walk-in tent sites
  • Designated bike-in camp area
  • Flush toilets/showers
  • Firewood
  • Interpretive programs
  • Universal Access
  • One campsite is accessible to campers with disabilities

Alfred A. Loeb State Park 

camping in oregon

Credit to oregonstateparks.org

You’ll love the fresh scent of the myrtlewood forest … a crisp, eucalyptus-like fragrance, where this campground is situated. These trees not only smell divine, many of which are well over 200 years old.  The pristine Chetco River runs clean and clear along the southeast edge of the park, making this a great site for anyone who loves to fish.

  • 48 electrical sites with water (first come, first served)
  • Three reservable rustic log cabins (one pet-friendly)
  • Day Use/Picnic Facilities (3 areas reservable May-Sept.)
  • Flush toilets and hot showers
  • River and gravel bar access for fishing
  • Firewood for sale
  • No dump station

Universal Access. One campsite, one cabin and one picnic area are accessible to campers with disabilities.

Beverly Beach State Park

camping in oregon

Credit to oregonstateparks.org

  • 53 full-hook up sites (27 with cable TV)
  • 76 electrical sites with water (32 pull-through)
  • 128 tent sites with water nearby
  • 21 yurts (10 pet-friendly)
  • Three seasonal group tent camping areas
  • Hiker/biker camp
  • Flush toilets and hot showers
  • RV dump station
  • Firewood for sale
  • Yurt meeting hall

Universal Access. Three campsites and six yurts are accessible to campers with disabilities.

Bullards Beach State Park  – Camping in Oregon

camping in oregon

Credit to oregonstateparks.org

More info here

The horse camp features access to the beach and dunes for our equestrian campers. A refurbished hiker/ biker camp offers storage lockers that contain solar powered USB charging ports for electronic devices. Well known for excellent fishing and crabbing opportunities on the Coquille River, our boat launch facilities remain busy during the summer and fall seasons.

The historic Coquille River Lighthouse is located at the end of Bullards Beach Road.

  • 103 full-hookup sites
  • 82 electrical sites with water
  • 3 yurts (Six pet-friendly)
  • Horse camp with eight primitive sites
  • Hiker/biker camp
  • Yurt meeting hall
  • RV dump station
  • Universal Access. Six campsites and three yurts are ADA accessible.

Cape Blanco State Park – Camping in Oregon

camping in oregon

Credit to oregonstateparks.org

More info here

Cape Blanco is the most southern of Oregon’s lighthouses, and is the westernmost point in Oregon. Proposed in 1864, it was the first lighthouse in the state outfitted with a first-order Fresnel lens in 1870. The first-order lens was replaced with a second-order lens in 1936.

There are 8 miles of hiking trails, and 7 miles of horse trails.

  • 52 electrical sites with water (first come, first served)
  • Four reservable standard cabins (two pet-friendly)
  • Reservable horse camp
  • Reservable group camp
  • Hiker/biker camp
  • Firewood for sale
  • Flush toilets and hot showers
  • Universal Access Six sites and one cabin are accessible to campers with disabilities.

Cape Lookout State Park  – Camping in Oregon

camping in oregon

Credit to oregonstateparks.org

More info here

  • 38 full-hookup sites
  • 170 tent sites with water nearby
  • One electrical site with water
  • 13 yurts (Six pet-friendly)
  • Six deluxe cabins (3 pet-friendly)
  • Two group tent camping areas
  • Hiker/biker camp
  • Meeting hall
  • Hot showers and flush toilets
  • Firewood for sale
  • RV dump station (closed in winter)
  • Universal Access. Two campsites, one cabin and nine yurts are accessible to campers with disabilities.

Carl G. Washburne Memorial State Park – Camping in Oregon

camping in oregon

Credit to oregonstateparks.org

More info here

  • 41 full-hookup sites (first come, first served)
  • 14 electrical sites with water (first come, first served)
  • Seven walk-in tent sites (closed seasonally)
  • Hiker/biker camp
  • Two reservable yurts (one pet-friendly)
  • Flush toilets and hot showers
  • RV dump station in day-use area
  • Firewood for sale
  • Universal Access. Site 30 is accessible to campers with disabilities.

Collier Memorial State Park – Camping in Oregon

camping in oregon

Credit to oregonstateparks.org

More info here

A Loop

  • 16 full-hookup sites
  • 18 non-hookup sites with water nearby
  • Hot showers and flush toilets

B Loop

  • 30 full-hookup sites (nine pull-through)
  • Universal Access. Campsite A30 is accessible to campers with disabilities.

Deschutes River State Recreation Area

Camping in Oregon

Credit to oregonstateparks.org

More info here

A Loop (open year-round)

  • 34 electrical sites with water for RV or tent camping (water shut off in the winter)
  • Flush toilets and hot showers (closed in winter)
  • Paved parking pads
  • First come, first served Nov. 1 – Mid-April

            B Loop (closed in winter)

  • 14 primitive RV/tent sites
  • Vault toilets & potable water nearby

            G Loop (closed in winter)

  • 4 reservable primitive RV/tent camping areas
  • Group areas accommodate up to five RVs or tents for up to 25 people
  • Vault toilets & potable water nearby

T Loop (closed in winter)

  • 11 primitive sites for tents and small RVs (maximum combined length of 24 feet)
  • Vault toilets & potable water nearby

Detroit Lake State Recreation Area – Camping in Oregon

camping in oregon

Credit to oregonstateparks.org

More info here

Detroit Lake’s campground offers nearly 300 sites on the shore of a forest-ringed canyon reservoir in the Cascade Mountains. The nine-mile-long lake is a popular destination for fishing, boating, and other water sports. Sightseers enjoy views of snow-capped Mt. Jefferson in the distance.The campground has horseshoe pits, a basketball court, a volleyball area, and a playground. There are two courtesy boat ramps, two reservable boat moorages, and a fishing dock. There is also a Visitor Center that has park and area information along with gifts, ice, soft drinks, firewood, souvenirs and educational toys that can be purchased.

 

  • 107 full-hookup sites
  • 68 electrical sites with water
  • 96 tent sites with water nearby
  • Showers and flush toilets
  • Swimming areas
  • Firewood for sale
  • Universal Access. Three campsites are accessible to campers with disabilities.

For more information about the local area and events go to www.detroitlakeoregon.org

Devil’s Lake State Recreation Area – Camping in Oregon

camping in oregon

Credit to oregonstateparks.org

More info here

  • 28 full-hookup sites with cable TV
  • Five electrical sites with water (four with cable TV)
  • 54 tent sites with water nearby
  • 10 yurts (five pet-friendly)
  • Hiker/biker camp
  • Flush toilets and hot showers
  • Firewood for sale
  • 12 reservable boat moorage slips (no launch ramp in campground)
  • Universal Access. Two campsites and two yurts are accessible to campers with disabilities.

Emigrant Springs State Heritage Area – Camping in Oregon

camping in oregon

Credit to oregonstateparks.org

More info here

A Loop

  • 16 full-hookup sites
  • 18 non-hookup sites with water nearby
  • Hot showers and flush toilets

           B Loop

  • 30 full-hookup sites (nine pull-through)
  • Universal Access. Campsite A30 is accessible to campers with disabilities.
  • A day use area is also available

Farewell Bend State Recreation Area – Camping in Oregon

camping in oregon

Credit to oregonstateparks.org

More info here

  • 91 electrical sites with water
  • 30 tent sites with water nearby
  • Hiker/biker camp
  • Two log cabins (open March 1st through November 30th, one pet friendly)
  • Group tent camp
  • Hot showers and flush toilets
  • Firewood and ice for sale
  • RV dump station
  • Horseshoe pits, basketball hoops and volleyball court
  • Universal Access. One electrical campsite and both cabins are accessible to campers with disabilities.

Fort Stevens State Park – Camping in Oregon

Camping in Oregon

Credit to oregonstateparks.org

More info here

Fort Stevens was once the primary military defense installation in the three-fort, Harbor Defense System at the mouth of the Columbia River (along with Forts Canby and Columbia in Washington). The fort saw service for 84 years, from the Civil War to World War II. Today, Fort Stevens has grown into a 4,300 acre park offering exploration of history, nature, and many recreational opportunities.

  • 174 full-hookup sites (36 pull-through)
  • 302 electrical sites with water (11 pull-through)
  • Six tent sites with water nearby
  • 15 yurts (7 pet-friendly)
  • 11 deluxe cabins (5 pet-friendly)
  • Hiker/biker camp
  • Flush toilets and hot showers
  • RV dump station
  • Adult Bike Rentals
  • Universal Access. Four sites, eight cabins and 10 yurts are accessible to campers with disabilities.

Goose Lake State Recreation Area – Camping in Oregon

camping in oregon

Credit to oregonstateparks.org

More info here

Goose Lake State Recreation Area is a green and shady destination of wildlife and wildlife watchers on the Oregon-California border.

  • 42 electrical sites with water (first come, first served)
  • 6 tent sites
  • 20 amp electrical outlets
  • Hiker/biker camp
  • Grassy area for tents
  • Flush toilets and hot showers
  • RV dump station

Harris Beach State Park – Camping in Oregon

Camping in Oregon

Credit to oregonstateparks.org

More info here

The park boasts the largest island off the Oregon coast.  Bird Island (also called Goat Island) is a National Wildlife Sanctuary and breeding site for such rare birds as the tufted puffin.

  • 65 full-hookup sites
  • 25 electrical sites with water
  • 59 tent sites with water nearby
  • Six yurts (three pet-friendly)
  • Hiker/biker camp
  • Playground
  • Flush toilets and hot showers
  • Firewood for sale
  • RV dump station
  • Universal Access. One campsite and one yurt are accessible to campers with disabilities.

Humbug Mountain State Park – Camping in Oregon

camping in oregon

Credit to oregonstateparks.org

More info here

Many visitors enjoy windsurfing and scuba diving. Hiking to the top of Humbug Mountain is a major activity.

  • 39 electrical sites with water (five pull-through)
  • 56 tent sites with water nearby
  • Hot showers and flush toilets
  • Hiker/biker camp
  • Firewood for sale
  • Universal Access. Two electrical sites are accessible to campers with disabilities.

Jessie M. Honeyman Memorial State Park – Camping in Oregon

Credit to oregonstateparks.org

More info here

  • 47 full-hookup sites
  • 121 electrical sites with water
  • 187 tent sites with water nearby
  • 10 yurts (five pet-friendly)
  • Six seasonal group tent camping areas
  • Hiker/biker camp
  • Firewood for sale
  • RV dump station
  • Universal Access. Four campsites and two yurts are accessible to campers with disabilities.

Joseph H. Stewart State Recreation Area – Camping in Oregon

camping in oregon

Credit to oregonstateparks.org

More info here

The park is about 40 miles from Crater Lake National Park, and makes an excellent jumping-off point for an exploration of Southern Oregon.

  • 151 electrical sites with water
  • 50 tent sites with water
  • Two group tent camping areas
  • Flush toilets and hot showers
  • RV dump station
  • Volleyball court
  • Horseshoe pits
  • Fenced, off-leash pet exercise area
  • Playground
  • Summer programs Friday and Saturday evenings

L.L. Stub Stewart State Park – Camping in Oregon

camping in oregon

Credit to oregonstateparks.org

More info here

An 18-hole disc golf course winds its way through the trees just east of Hilltop, and a 3-hole course is near the amphitheater. Buy discs at the Stub Stewart Welcome Center, where bike helmets, water bottles and more are for sale.

Dairy Creek Camp West (open year-round)

  • 43 full-hookup sites
  • 12 walk-in tent sites with water nearby
  • Flush toilets and hot showers
    camping in oregon

    Credit to oregonstateparks.org

  • Reservable meeting hall
  • Firewood and ice for sale 5 – 8 pm

Dairy Creek Camp East (open March 1 – Oct. 31)

  • 35 full-hookup sites
  • Flush toilets and hot showers
  • Playground

Hares Canyon Horse Camp (open March 1 – Oct. 31)

  • 13 full-hookup sites with four-stall corrals
  • Two double-size full-hookup sites with six-stall corrals
  • Manure bins
  • Flush toilets and hot showers

Note: All RV hookup sites are at least 50 feet long

Brooke Creek Hike-in Camp (open year-round)

  • 23 primitive campsites with water nearby
  • Picnic table at each site
  • Two common areas with fire rings
  • Two vault toilets (access to flush toilets and hot showers)
  • Sites 1-9 are available first come, first served
  • Sites 10-23 are reservable

Mountain Dale Cabin Village (year-round)

  • Three double-room cabins (cabin 6 is pet friendly)
  • 12 single-room cabins (cabins 7 and 8 are pet friendly)
  • Flush toilets and hot showers in cabin village restroom
  • Universal Access. Three sites at Dairy Creek West, two sites at Dairy Creek East and 13 cabins are accessible to campers with disabilities.

LaPine State Park – Camping in Oregon

camping in oregon

Credit to oregonstateparks.org

More info here

The park is also home to Oregon’s largest ponderosa pine. Nicknamed “Big Red,” the tree is 162′ tall, 28.9′ around and may be in excess of 500 years old.

  • 82 full-hookup sites
  • 47 electrical sites with water
  • Five rustic log cabins (one pet-friendly)
  • Five deluxe log cabins (one pet-friendly)
  • Hot showers and flush toilets
  • Log cabin meeting hall
  • Park store (seasonal)
  • Firewood and ice sales (seasonal)
  • RV dump station
  • Fenced, off-leash pet exercise area
  • Universal Access. All of the deluxe cabins and one rustic cabin are accessible to campers with disabilities (winter accessibility varies).

Lake Owyhee State Park – Camping in Oregon

camping in oregon

Credit to oregonstateparks.org

More info here

Owyhee Reservoir is a 53-mile-long lake, filling a narrow, deep canyon brimming with colorful volcanic rock formations.  Some of the geology is visible only by boat. Anglers will love the excellent warm water catches, especially largemouth bass, white and black crappie.  The reservoir also has catfish and is occasionally stocked with rainbow trout.

Indian Creek and McCormack campgrounds are closed to reservations starting October 1, but available first come, first served during October. Both campgrounds close for the season on November 1. Gordon Gulch Day Use picnic area is open year round.

Camping in Oregon

Credit to HipCamp

McCormack Campground – Camping in Oregon

  • 29 electrical sites with water
  • Eight tent sites with water nearby
  • Hot showers and flush toilets
  • RV dump station
  • Firewood, ice for sale

Indian Creek Campground – Camping in Oregon

  • 22 electrical sites with water
  • Two cabins (open May 11; one pet-friendly)
  • Boat ramp
  • Marine fuel, firewood and ice for sale
  • Universal Access. McCormack has two sites accessible to campers with disabilities.

Indian Creek has two sites and one cabin accessible to campers with disabilities.

Memaloose State Park – Camping in Oregon

camping in oregon

Credit to oregonstateparks.org

More info here

  • 43 full-hookup sites
  • 66 tent sites with water nearby
  • Flush toilets and hot showers
  • RV dump station

Milo McIver State Park – Camping in Oregon 

camping in oregon

Credit to oregonstateparks.org

More info here

  • 44 electrical sites with water
  • Nine tent sites with water nearby
  • Hot showers and flush toilets
  • Three reservable group tent camping areas with water, flush toilets and fire rings
  • Three hiker/biker campsites with water, lockers, solar charging station and fire pit
  • RV dump station
  • Universal Access. One campsite is accessible to campers with disabilities.

Prineville Reservoir State Park – Camping in Oregon

camping in oregon

Credit to oregonstateparks.org

More info here

  • 22 full-hookup sites
  • 22 electrical sites with water
  • 23 tent sites with water nearby
  • Five deluxe log cabins (one pet-friendly)
  • Flush toilets and hot showers
  • 32 boat moorages (summer only)
  • Amphitheater
  • Universal Access. Two campsites and two cabins are accessible to campers with disabilities.

Silver Falls State Park – Camping in Oregon

Camping in Oregon

oregonstateparks.org

More info here

  • 22 full-hookup sites
  • 22 electrical sites with water
  • 23 tent sites with water nearby
  • Five deluxe log cabins (one pet-friendly)
  • Flush toilets and hot showers
  • 32 boat moorages (summer only)
  • Amphitheater
  • Universal Access. Two campsites and two cabins are accessible to campers with disabilities.

South Beach State Park – Camping in Oregon

camping in oregon

Credit to oregonstateparks.org

More info here

  • 227 electrical sites with water
  • 60 tent sites
  • 27 yurts (14 pet-friendly)
  • Three group tent camping areas
  • Hiker/biker camp
  • Flush toilets and hot showers
  • Firewood and ice available for purchase
  • RV dump station
  • Universal Access. Five campsites (two electrical, three tent) and 24 yurts are accessible to campers with disabilities.

Sunset Bay State Park – Camping in Oregon

camping in oregon

Credit to oregonstateparks.org

More info here

A public golf course is located next to the park and the nearby fishing village of Charleston provides opportunities for crabbing, clamming and fishing.

  • Approximately 30 full-hookup sites
  • Approximately 35 electrical sites with water
  • More than 65 tent sites with water nearby
  • Eight yurts (4 pet friendly)
  • Two group tent camping areas
  • Hiker/biker camp
  • Flush toilets and hot showers
  • Firewood for sale
  • Universal Access. Three campsites and three yurts are accessible to campers with disabilities.

Each campsite fee includes parking for one vehicle and a tow vehicle. Campers may have a total of two vehicles per site; extra vehicle is $7 per night. Additional vehicles may not be allowed in the park overnight.

The Cove Palisades State Park – Camping in Oregon

camping in oregon

Credit to oregonstateparks.org

More info here

  • 3 deluxe cabins (one pet-friendly)

Crooked River Campground (open mid-February to mid-December)

  • 88 electrical sites with water
  • RV dump station
  • Flush toilets and hot showers
  • Firewood for sale
  • Outdoor amphitheater
  • Fenced, off-leash pet exercise area

Deschutes Campground (open mid-May to mid-September)

  • 85 full-hookup sites (13 pull-through)
  • 91 tent sites with water nearby
  • Three group tent camping areas
  • Flush toilets and hot showers
  • Firewood for sale
  • Camp store
  • 21 reservable boat moorages
  • Fish cleaning station
  • Outdoor amphitheater
  • Fenced, off-leash pet exercise area
  • Universal Access. Six sites are accessible to campers with disabilities.

Tumalo State Park – Camping in Oregon

camping in oregon

Credit to oregonstateparks.org

More info here

  • 23 full-hookup sites
  • 54 tent sites
  • Seven yurts (two pet-friendly)
  • Two seasonal group camping areas
  • Two seasonal group picnic areas
  • Seasonal hiker/biker camp
  • Showers and flush toilets
  • Firewood and ice sales (in season)

Universal Access. Four campsites and one yurt are accessible to campers with disabilities.

Umpqua Lighthouse State Park – Camping in Oregon

camping in oregon

Credit to oregonstateparks.org

More info here

Umpqua Lighthouse State Park is located less than a mile from the famous Salmon Harbor on Winchester Bay. The campground and developed day use areas are centered around beautiful Lake Marie. Access to this small freshwater lake is provided for angling and non-motorized boating. There is also a small sandy beach set aside for swimming or just relaxing.

  • 12 full hookup sites
  • Eight electrical sites with water
  • 23 tent sites with water nearby
  • Two rustic yurts (one pet-friendly)
  • Six deluxe yurts (three pet-friendly)
  • Two rustic log cabins (one pet-friendly)
  • Hiker/biker camp
  • Hot showers and flush toilets
  • Universal Access. One deluxe yurt is accessible to campers with disabilities.

Valley of the Rogue State Park – Camping in Oregon

camping in oregon

Credit to oregonstateparks.org

More info here

Camp and play along the river made famous by novelist and avid fisherman Zane Grey. The campground is also a great place to stay while taking in the local culture, history, and recreation opportunities in the area. Stay here if you plan to take trips to Crater Lake National Park, the Oregon Caves National Monument, historic Jacksonville, Ashland’s Shakespeare Festival, or the Britt Music Festival. The park is ideally located to give you all of this, plus friendly local shops, museums, and sights of interest.

  • 95 full-hookup sites (23 pull-through)
  • 55 electrical sites with water
  • 14 tent sites with water nearby
  • Eight yurts (four pet-friendly)
  • Three group tent camping areas
  • Meeting hall
  • Flush toilets and hot showers
  • Laundry facilities
  • Firewood for sale
  • RV dump station
  • Universal Access. Two campsites are accessible to campers with disabilities.

Viento State Park – Camping in Oregon

camping in oregon

Credit to oregonstateparks.org

More info here

Viento is next to a working railroad line and crossing. Visitors and campers can expect to hear train horns throughout the day and night. Interstate 84 also borders the park.

  • 56 electrical sites with water
  • 18 tent sites with water nearby
  • Flush toilets and hot showers
  • Interpretive programs
  • Universal Access. Two campsites accessible to campers with disabilities.

Wallowa Lake State Park – Camping in Oregon

camping in oregon

Credit to oregonstateparks.org

More info here

There are gift shops nearby and a thriving artist community which does world-class bronze castings. Tours are available through the foundries and the showroom displays will keep you interested for hours. Wallowa Lake also serves as a gateway to visit Hells Canyon, the deepest gorge in North America.

  • 121 Full-hookup sites (36 pull-through)
  • 88 tent sites with water nearby
  • Two yurts (Both ADA; one pet friendly)
  • Group Tent camping
  • Group Picnic areas
  • Hot showers and flush toilets (ADA available)
  • RV dump station
  • Universal Access. Two sites and both yurts are accessible to campers with disabilities.

NOTE: The yurts and five hookup sites are open and reservable all year. From November 1 to mid-May, some hookup and non-hookup sites will be available first come, first served.

Day Use Permits

Of the hundreds of day-use parks in the Oregon state park system, around two dozen charge a day-use parking fee. These areas do not have campsites, but most do have facilities like restrooms, fire-pits, and grills. Check the website for each area before going to see which parks allow pets, etc.

First-come, first served campgrounds

camping in oregon

Washburne
Credit to oregonstateparks.org

Here’s a list of the first-come, first-served campgrounds:

North Coast

Saddle Mountain

Central Coast

Washburne

South Coast

Cape Blanco

Loeb

Willamette Valley

camping in oregon

North Santiam
Credit to oregonstateparks.org

Cascadia

Cascara (Fall Creek)

North Santiam

Southern Oregon

Jackson Kimball

Central/Eastern Oregon

Bates

Catherine Creek

Clyde Holliday

Cottonwood Canyon

Camping in Oregon

Cottonwood Canyon
Credit to oreganstateparks.org

Emigrant Springs (mix of first-come, first served and reservable sites)

Farewell Bend (A Loop first-come, first served. B and C Loops reservable)

Goose Lake

Hilgard Junction

Jasper Point Campground at Prineville Reservoir

Lake Owyhee (mix of first-come, first served and reservable sites)

Minam

Red Bridge

Smith Rock (special walk-in bivouac camping)

Ukiah-Dale

Unity Lake

Things to do while camping in Oregon.

Agate Beach Wayside

camping in oregon

Credit to oregonstateparks.org

More info here

Phone: 800.551.6949

Park:  541-265-4560

Razor clamming is a favorite activity along the beaches of Oregon. It’s second in popularity with visitors only to surfing. If you plan to visit prime Newport attractions like the Oregon Coast Aquarium and Hatfield Marine Science Center, you must stop in for a refreshing picnic at Agate Beach.

Agate Beach Wayside is situated between the new and old highway 101. There is a large parking lot with room for trailer parking. The beach access trail consists of a tunnel that goes underneath the old highway 101 to a large sandy beach area. This is a day use area only, but you can camp at nearby

Oregon Coast Aquarium

camping in oregon

Credit to aquarium.org

More info here

Phone: 541-867-3474

The Oregon Coast Aquarium is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization located in Newport, on the beautiful Oregon Coast. Their mission is to create unique and engaging experiences that connect visitors to the Oregon coast and inspire ocean conservation. As one of Oregon’s top tourist attractions, the Aquarium is a vital educational resource for the state, with over 40,000 students visiting the Aquarium each year. The Aquarium strives to be a center of excellence for ocean literacy and plays an active role in conservation and animal rehabilitation efforts.

Hatfield Marine Science Center

camping in oregon

Credit to Shawn O

More info here

The Visitor Center is proud to be a Coastal Ecosystem Learning Center, one of 22 such centers nationwide that teach, share research, and inform the public about the coastal and marine habitats in America.The Hatfield Marine Science Center offers classes, workshops, tours and more so both adults, children, families and schools can observe and interact with a variety of marine animals from sandy beaches, estuaries and rocky shores. See their website for a full list of what programs are available and pricing.

Whale Watching Center

Info: 800-551-6949

Park Phone: 541-765-3304

Open Wednesday – Sunday

10:00 AM through 4:00 PM

Closed on Monday and Tuesday.

For the latest updates, please email us at Whale.watching@oregon.gov or call at 541-765-3304.

Whale watching takes place year-round on the Oregon Coast, but if you want to be assured of spotting a whale, and learning about what they’re doing, the best place to go is the Whale Watching Center. Park staff are waiting to answer your questions and help you spot the gray whales that blow, dive, breach and swim off of the seawall in scenic Depoe Bay.

During the busiest weeks of the year, thousands of gray whales migrate past the windows or the center on their way to and from the waters of Alaska and Mexico. It’s not just whales who swim by. Many species, including humpback whales, orcas, dolphins, porpoise and even blue whales have been spotted from the center. In the Winter, from mid-December through mid-January, nearly 20,000 gray whales travel south to the warm lagoons of Baja Mexico. Spring watching begins in late March.

The gray whales travel north on their way towards Alaska. The first surge swims by around the end of March the northbound whales are easily spotted all the way until June. Summer and Fall bring whales that feed along our coast from June to mid-November. While the larger groups of whales aren’t typical, the center consistently sees between 5 and 15 whales every day. The center is home to the Whale Watching Spoken Here volunteer program, which sponsors the winter and spring break Whale Watching Weeks. https://whalespoken.wordpress.com/